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The 10 PM Daily Quiz – 31 May, 2016

31-may

Hi Friends,

Starting Monday, March 28, 2016 We are taking up a new initiatives for Prelims 2016 . We will be posting a 7-10 Questions Quiz based on 9 PM Brief, on a daily basis.

The purpose of these is to enable practise on a daily level for you to prepare Current Affairs for Civil Services Prelims Examination. This questions will be moderate level and it is expected of you solve these questions with decent overview of 9 PM Brief

Please type your answers in the comments below .

Note : Answers to the quiz will be posted one day later.


Q.1) Consider the two statements:

Statement I: The government has come up with a smartphone policy for officials dealing with sensitive information.

Statement II: Pakistan Intelligence Agencies were spying on Indian Security Forces by sending malwares in mobile apps.

Examine the two statement carefully and answer using the code given below:

a) Both the statements are individually true and the statement II is the reason for statement I.
b) Both the statements are individually true and the statement II is not the reason for statement I.
c) Statement I is true.
d) Statement II is true.


Q.2) Consider the following statements regarding India’s global competitiveness rank:

  1. It rose to 41 from 44th a year ago.
  2. This is due to significant improvement in exchange rate stability, fiscal deficit management and efforts to tackle corruption and red tape.

Select the correct statement using the codes given below:

a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) Both are correct
d) Neither is correct


Q.3) Consider the following statements regarding Maternal and neonatal tetanus (MNT):

  1. It is the most common lethal consequences of unclean deliveries and umbilical cord care practices.
  2. India had eradicated maternal and neonatal tetanus in 2015.  
  3. According to WHO MNT can be eliminated (defined as less than one case of neonatal tetanus per 1000 live births in every district).

Select the correct statement using the codes given below:

a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) 1 and 2 only
d) All of the above


Q.4) Which of the following is not an African country?

a) Liberia
b) Cameroon
c) Armenia
d) Benin


Q.5) Consider the following statements about U.N. International Day of Peacekeepers

  1. It is observed on May 30 of every year.
  2. The first U.N. peacekeeping mission was established before the independence of India.

Select the correct statement using the codes given below:

a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) Both are correct
d) Neither is correct


Q.6) Which of the following neighbours of India has been given the dialogue partners in the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation?

  1. Bhutan
  2. Bangladesh
  3. Sri Lanka
  4. Nepal

Select the correct statement using the codes given below:
a) 1 and 3
b) 1 and 4
c) 2 and 3
d) 3 and 4


Q.7) Which of the following type of loan is not covered by MUDRA scheme?

a) Shishu
b) Tarun
c) Vridhavastha
d) Kishore

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9 PM Daily NEWS Brief

9 PM Daily Brief – 31 May 2016

31

Brief of newspaper articles for the day bearing
relevance to Civil Services preparation

What is 9 PM brief?


GS PAPER 2


[1] ‘Nations need a say in peace keeping’

The Hindu

News

  • Army Chief General Dalbir Singh said that nations contributing troops to United Nations Peace Keeping (UNPK) missions need greater say in the conduct of the missions of which they were part of.

 

Context

While developing countries are the major troop contributing nations but the decision making is done by the developed countries and the permanent five countries in the Security Council who hardly contribute any boots on the ground.

 

UN mandate

  • Article 44 of the UN Charter provides the mechanism for troop contributing nations to be part of discussions with UNSC members on peacekeeping.
  • However, this has been bypassed by a new mechanism adopted in 2003.
  • India –  the topmost contributing nation for peace keeping has often expressed concern on violation of these provisions.

 

[2] The right to intervene

The Hindu

Issue

  • Humanitarian intervention has often been used as a pretext for regime change.

 

Intervention on “Humanitarian grounds”

  • If the West decided that a conflict demanded intervention, then the full force of Western power would be brought to bear on those whom the West determined to be the “bad guys”. This was the gist of humanitarian interventionism.
  • Yugoslavia faced the barrage of “humanitarian intervention”, the new term of art for Western bombardment in the service of protecting civilians.
  • The idea of humanitarian intervention was reduced to a fig leaf for Western interests.

 

Responsibility to Protect (R2P)

  • Under Kofi Annan’s watch, the U.N. endorsed the new idea of Responsibility to Protect (R2P) in 2005.
  • This new doctrine asked that sovereign states respect the human rights of their citizens.
  • When these rights are violated, then sovereignty dissolves.
  • An outside actor endorsed by the U.N. can then come in to protect the citizens.
  • Once more, no precise definition existed for who gets to define the nature of a conflict and who gets to intervene.
  • A critic of R2P called it as “redecorated colonialism” and said that “a more accurate name for R2P would be the right to intervene”.

 

Use of R2P by insurgents

  • An uprising against the Libyan government in February 2011 provided the opportunity to test R2P.
  • During the Yugoslavian war, the Kosovo Liberation Army had made it clear that they used their fighters in strategic ways so as to provoke a response from the Yugoslavian army; massacres of civilians, they felt, would be the best way to bring in Western air power on their side and turn any conflict to their advantage.
  • The rebels in Libya (and later in Syria) had much the same strategic assessment.
  • If they could elicit state violence, then they might be able to assert their right to international protection.
  • But it has its own limitation, it can only work if the adversary of the rebels was an enemy of the West, as it did not worked for the Palestinians.

 

Critics of Humanitarian intervention

  • What appeared as a successful intervention in Libya was seen in the BRICS states — as a dangerous precedent.
  • The BRICS countries now saw that protection of civilians actually meant regime change whose aftermath was horrendous.
  • Critics of humanitarian intervention are not callous about the horrors of war and genocide. Sovereignty cannot be a shield for massacre of civilians.
  • Yet, at the same time, proponents of intervention watch disasters unfold and then wait till the last minute when a military operation becomes necessary.
  • They do not want to acknowledge the long-term reforms needed to prevent the escalation of conflict into genocidal territory.
  • The critics worry that humanitarian intervention of the Western variety ignores causes and produces terrible outcomes.

 

Solution

  • R2P did not address the protection of civilians from the multiple horsemen of the 21st century apocalypse — illiteracy, illness, poverty, joblessness and social toxicity.
  • These are the authors of crisis. Bombs cannot defeat them.
  • An antidote to mass atrocities might come from global financial reform, the redistribution of wealth and U.N. Security Council reform. Violence, he argued, is an outcome of grotesque inequality.

 

[3] Grappling with our prejudices

The Hindu

Issue

  • India- Africa relations

 

Context

  • Racism faced by African residents in India.

 

Racism faced by African nationals

  • The African residents feel deeply insecure in India as they negotiate racism on a daily basis.
  • There has been incidents of mobbing, beating, and stripping of African residents in various cities across India, along with wildly exaggerated accusations of criminal activity, sometimes by state authorities themselves.

 

India-Africa relations

  • India and various African countries encourage trade, aid and skill-based partnerships, the movement of people between these regions is on the rise, requiring urgent mechanisms to ensure the safety and security of migrant populations.
  • Not only is this a basic expectation from a member of the community of nations, but is also critical to the hopes of a South-South axis of economic and political partnership.

 

Enough is Enough

  • The ensuing reaction by the Heads of Mission of African countries, stating that they would boycott the African Day celebration as they were in mourning, was strong but not unwarranted.
  • The Heads of Mission approached the issue strategically by stating they could no longer encourage their citizens to come to India as they fear for their safety and security.
  • Given that trade between India and Africa has grown phenomenally in the last few years, this call assumes an economic form.

 

Reduced Interaction will affect India miserably

  • Both India and Africa have been working towards strengthening geopolitical and economic ties.
  • Trade between the two regions has increased from $6 billion in 2005 to $64 billion in 2013.
  • Also, India sees African citizens as prospective medical and education tourists, further bolstering the Indian economy.
  • Thus, the threats of reducing interaction and the powerful statement of ‘mourning’ seem to be designed to hit where it hurts India the most.

 

Living in Isolation

  • It is important to note that there is great diversity among African nationals but in the face of oppression they adopt similar tactics, and the community has attempted to move further underground.
  • They seek to minimise their interactions with Indians and the wider urban landscape by choosing social interactions that take place inside homes and at night.
  • This strategy does not allow them the space or time to understand or successfully adapt to the social climate they now find themselves in.

 

Sensitisation programmes

  • The stereotypes about Africans being lawless and immoral needs to be addressed in India.Bridges of communication are essential to ensure meaningful exchange and a healthier lifestyle for both the African migrants and Indian nationals.
  • Many Indians live in fear of the African population.
  • While their ideas of Africans are regressive and absurd, to say the least, it is important to create appropriate channels of communication to allow for fraternity or at least peace to emerge.
  • Merely shaming local residents and calling them racist will do nothing to change the situation on the ground.

 

Role of the Government

  • The strategies used by the Central and State governments and the embassies should be varied, and involve formal and informal processes that focus on providing security and encourage mutual respect.
  • The Indian states must provide clear guidelines for African migrants to register complaints.
  • In addition to this, sensitisation programmes are essential to reduce the overall atmosphere of hostility and improve the quality of life for all parties concerned.
  • These are vital in particular to improve the life of undocumented migrants who may be unable to access formal channels.
  • The embassies could provide more informal channels of support by focussing on discussions and visibility-enhancing local interventions with the help of NGOs.
  • They could also utilise the traditional strategy of creating safe spaces for children from affected neighbourhoods, from all the concerned communities, to learn together and normalise difference.
  • This mixture of legal and social processes could help create a more supportive environment for migrants and Indians who live in close proximity to each other.

 

Beyond tokenism

  • After the recent attacks, the Indian government has  recognised the existence of a clear problem.
  • Indian government and the police have either side-stepped or denied that the violence has stemmed from racial prejudice.
  • This is a dangerous sign and seems almost hypocritical for a polity that has taken a clear stand on instances of racial violence against Indians in other countries.
  • Government’s  actions should be  based on the values of justice, liberty and fraternity that the Indian Constitution, and by extension India, is based upon.
  • The current pledges of support require extensive work on the ground and in terms of policy to ensure that the ideas stated by the government go beyond tokenism.

 

[4] The MGNREGA index

The Hindu

The Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act of 2005 (MGNREGA) aims at:

  • Enhancing the livelihood security of people in rural areas by guaranteeing 100 days of wage-employment in a financial year to a rural household whose adult members volunteer to do unskilled manual work.
  • In the financial year 2015-16, Rs.42,084 crore was spent on MGNREGA.

 

Assessment of the implementation of the Act by the States between 2015 and 2016.

Performance indicators:

  • There are three performance indicators to rank the States:
    • Average days of employment per household
    • Percentage wages paid within the promised 15 days of enlisting to work
    • The work completion rate
  • Each indicator measures the implementation of MGNREGA in the State on an important output.
  • Collectively the three indicators capture the key aspects of MGNREGA implementation, namely, employment generation, wages paid in time, and assets created as promised.
  • MGNREGA guarantees 100 days of employment, the national average has always been below 50 days.
  • Comparing this value across States, Tripura was able to provide 95 days of employment on average.
  • Manipur and Goa were at the lower end, providing 16 and 18 days of employment, respectively.
  • MGNREGA requires that wages be paid within 15 days of closing the muster roll.
  • Last financial year, only 40 per cent of the wages were paid within the stipulated time of 15 days.
  • Manipur stood out in this case with 82 per cent of wages being paid within 15 days while
  • Meghalaya was only able to pay wages for 4 per cent of the people on time.
  • Work completion rate refers to the number of works completed compared to works started, in percentage terms.
  • Mizoram performed best in this case with a 92 per cent work completion rate.
  • Tripura, Haryana, Madhya Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh also had work completion rates of above 80 per cent.
  • Arunachal Pradesh was at the bottom at just 20 per cent work completion rate.

 

Performance score

  • The absolute values of each performance metric are scaled to a value between 0 and 10 by dividing with the highest value across States and multiplying it by 10.
  • The scores across all performance indicators to come up with the score out of 30.

 

Findings

  • It is interesting that two north-eastern States are at either extreme of the ranking:
  • Tripura on top with a score of 26.8 and Arunachal Pradesh at the bottom with a score of 7.1.
  • Mizoram was a close second with a score of 26.3. Chhattisgarh, Goa, Meghalaya and Punjab all ranked second from the bottom with a score of 12.7. Andhra Pradesh and Jharkhand were two major States with a high ranking.
  • West Bengal, Bihar and Uttar Pradesh were major States with a low score of 14.

 

This ranking intends to give an overview to the policymakers of what works in each State and what doesn’t.

  • The reasons could vary across and within States.
  • Analysing the State-wise data, it was seen that Tripura was able to generate about 95 days of employment per household.
  • The reasons for the high employment days in Tripura need to be studied, so that they can be replicated in other similar States.
  • Similarly, a big State such as Andhra Pradesh was able to pay 80 per cent of the wages within the promised 15 days of enlisting to work, and Madhya Pradesh was able to achieve 82 per cent work completion rate.
  • The best practices in each of these high-performing States should be documented and shared with the other States, so that the performance of each State can go up.
  • For example, Andhra Pradesh is known for widespread computerisation of the processes which reduces corruption and ensures timely transfer of funds.

 

Conclusion:

  • The Centre seems committed to MGNREGA. About 2 per cent of the Union Budget or 0.3 per cent of the GDP is allocated to the scheme.
  • Ensuring that this amount reaches the people who opt to work, while creating durable rural assets, is important.
  • This mega scheme needs local fixes and innovations to become more efficient and effective.
  • This points out the aspects of implementation lacking in various States and gives an idea about where to look to make implementation successful.
  • The ranking also recognises States that are performing well, and can be used to allocate funds and resources in a targeted manner.

 

[5] Raja Mandala: Regional India, global South Asia

Indian Express

Issue

  • GLobalisation of the Indian sub-continent

 

Recent events which highlights the importance of the Indian sub-continent on the international stage

  • Presence of Bangladesh and Sri Lanka at the G-7 summit at Ise-Shima, Japan.
  • China has already begun to integrate India’s neighbours into its larger international and regional strategies.
  • The $ 46 billion China-Pakistan economic corridor,  “dialogue partner” status to Sri Lanka and Nepal in Shanghai Cooperation Organisation are some examples.

 

India must come to terms with the unfolding globalisation of the Subcontinent

  • Much of the international discourse on South Asia often gets reduced to the India-Pakistan relations; this only helps mask the significance of the other nations in the region.
  • And the reference to them as “smaller nations” of the region is largely inaccurate.
  • With its focus on the Af-Pak region, however, India has tended to miss the growing strategic significance of the other nations in the neighbourhood.

 

Strategic importance of other nations

  • Bangladesh is today one of the fastest growing economies of the world and is open to massive investments in the infrastructure sector, and China and Japan are competing vigorously for project contracts in Bangladesh.
  • Long viewed as India’s buffers to the north, Bhutan and Nepal have now become theatres of contestation with China.
  • Sri Lanka is rediscovering its central location in the Indian Ocean, as all major powers like China, US and Japan pay unprecedented attention to Colombo.
  • Maldives, which straddles the vital sea lines of communication in the Indian Ocean, has now become a highly coveted piece of maritime real estate as China turns its gaze upon the Indian Ocean.

 

Wake up call

  • India must begin to recognise the growing gulf between its claims of primacy in the region and the growing economic, political and military influence of China in the Subcontinent.
  • Two, the new international opportunities have allowed the ruling elites in our neighbourhood to pursue greater “strategic autonomy” from India. This means Delhi will have to work harder than ever before to retain its historic leverages in the neighbourhood.
  • Three, the economic geography of the Subcontinent was inherently in India’s favour. Partition, the inward economic orientation of socialist India, and the neglect of connectivity and commerce at and across the frontiers has seen India lost many of the inherited advantages.
  • Four, India’s “neighbourhood first” strategy is complicated by its deep involvement in the internal politics of the South Asian nations. Those who are affected , they have learned to counter it by seeking intervention of other powers.
  • Last but not the least, India must stop seeing itself as the “lone ranger” in South Asia. While it must necessarily compete with rival powers when they threaten its interests, it must also learn to collaborate with friendly powers, wherever possible, in shaping the regional environment.

GS PAPER 3


[1] Hacking scare leads to norms for smartphones

The Hindu

News:

  • Pakistan Intelligence Agencies were spying on Indian Security Forces by sending malwares in mobile apps such as Top Gun (Game App), mpjunkie (music App), vdjunky (video app), talking frog (entertainment App).

 

Issue:

  • Attempts of hacking and data theft by Pakistan and China.
  • The government has come up with a smartphone policy for officials dealing with sensitive information.

 

Terms and conditions:

  • To begin with, the government has put curbs on officials connecting their phones to office computers.
  • They will not be allowed to even to charge the phone battery.
  • Further, every such device will have to be approved by seniors.

 

Who comes under this?

  • The rules would apply to armed forces, intelligence officials and personnel of the Central Armed Police Forces (CAPF).

 

Experts consulted:

  • Government official said the policy had been formulated after taking suggestions from several cyber experts.
  • Government have circulated the policy to all the government offices, especially those working in the field of intelligence gathering.

 

[2] Soon, postman will also deliver Ganga Jal

The Hindu

News:

  • Postal department might soon deliver water from the Ganga river to your doorstep.
  • Ganges which is considered holy by the Hindus.
  • Communications and IT Minister directed the Department of Posts to utilise e-commerce platform so that pure Ganga Jal from Haridwar and Rishikesh can be provided to the people.

 

E-governance app

  • Government is also working on a single mobile application through which citizens would be able to access over 1,000 e-governance services provided by the Centre, State governments as well as local authorities.
  • The new application UMANG — short for Unified Mobile App for New-age Governance — will be available in 12 Indian languages, besides English.
  • This application will be a game changer… a common mobile application for all government services.

 

Smartphones for postmen:

  • By March 2017, all postmen in urban centres will be given smartphones, while those in around 1.3 lakh rural post offices will be given handheld devices.
  • About 4,000 handheld devices have already been given.
  • It will help in financial inclusion.

 

[3] India climbs three notches in global competitiveness

The Hindu

News:

  • India’s global competitiveness rank rose to 41 from 44th a year ago.

 

Reason:

  • This is due to significant improvement in exchange rate stability, fiscal deficit management and efforts to tackle corruption and red tape, according to a survey by the Switzerland-based IMD World Competitiveness Centre (WCC).
  • Cost competitiveness, skilled workforce and a dynamic economy as India’s biggest plus points
  • High education levels as a positive factor.
  • Government’s competency made the economy more attractive.

 

India is still on 41st rank because of many reasons:

  • Higher consumer price inflation, lower public spending on education, tax revenue collection and merchandise exports proved to be the biggest drags on the country’s economic competitiveness, according to the Centre.

 

What are the biggest challenge for the Indian economy for 2016, according to IMD WCC ?

  • Sustaining its high growth rate, increasing the share of research and development in the economy and implementation of the Goods and Services Tax Regime.
  • Infrastructure development and disbursing public benefits digitally.

 

US ranked 3rd on the list and has dropped two places.

The sheer power of the U.S. economy is no longer sufficient to keep it at the top.

 

Rich getting richer

  • The rankings are based on analysis of over 340 criteria derived from four principal factors: economic performance, government efficiency, business efficiency and infrastructure.
  • Data gathered since the first ranking was published in 1989 also lend weight to fears that the rich are getting richer and the poor poorer.
  • Since 1995 the world has become increasingly unequal in terms of income differences among countries, although the rate of increase is now slowing.

 

Conclusion:

  • To improve on the list India should focus more on consumer price inflation and public spending on education.

Note: Global Competitiveness Rank should not be confused with Global Competitiveness Index which is published by World Economic Forum

 

[4] Measuring Mudra’s success

Livemint

Issue

  • Critical analysis of the Pradhan Mantri Mudra Yojana .

 

Context

  • Recently, PM modi has remarked that its government’s focus is to create a third sector—the personal sector—other than farms and factories wherein a person turns into a job provider through entrepreneurship rather than a job-seeker in the other two sectors.

 

Performance of Mudra

  • There are three types of loans under PMMY: Shishu (up to Rs.50,000), Kishore (from Rs.50,001 to Rs.5 lakh) and Tarun (from Rs.500,001 to Rs.10,00,000).
  • According to a estimate,  the total amount of loans disbursed under the PMMY programme crossed Rs.1.25 trillion as of March 2016.
  • Out of 32.7 million borrowers, 30.3 million borrowers were in the Shishu category.
  • Given its importance to the future evolution of the economy, it is useful to have as precise an idea as possible, ex-ante, of the economic and social outcomes that the government is seeking with such generous credit support.

 

Analysis of Mudra

  • If the outcomes are all about the quantum of loans disbursed, then it is no better than a loan mela and no better than an entitlement.
  • To measure the success of PMMY, one has to learn some hard truths about economic value added in MSME and in large enterprises.
  • Even within the organized sector, it is the larger units that are deploying the most capital, providing the most jobs, wages and emoluments and generating the most output.
  • There is an opportunity cost to resources allocated to generating micro and small entrepreneurship. Surely, they need to be encouraged but not to remain micro and small.
  • As firms age, they employ more people but  India is the exception.
  • A large portion of this peculiar Indian feature has to do with the fact that firms remain small in nature.
  • Perhaps, policy measures create a perverse incentive for them to remain small.
  • The aim of policy must be to make them grow out of their sizes at birth.

 

What should be the right criterion to measure success?

  • The government should measure the success (or failure) of its interventions by the extent of reduction in informal employment, the rise in formal employment and the extent of mobility of firms to medium and large sizes.
  • Objective criteria will help in making these decisions in an apolitical fashion.
  • For that, one of the conditions of the loans must be that entrepreneurs start to maintain books of accounts on employment, output, revenues, expenses and taxes.

 

Conclusion

Though small enterprises needs special attention, but the whole objective of this attention should be to watch them grow, not to let them remain small forever.

Categories
Daily Editorials for UPSC IAS Exam Preparation

Editorial Today – India’s growing Health Problem

To understand importance of health sector we have to first understand Human capital India is considered as a leading nation in the world in terms of human power.

What converts a population into a human capital?  Improving the health and nutritional status of the people.

Importance of health in human capital?If a population is not healthy it will not contribute to its full potential in the development of the country.

State of Health sector in India With respect to meeting its potential health outcomes and relative performance, the country has faltered.

WHO world Health Report 2016  Among South-East Asian Region (SEAR) nations, India ranks the worst in the relative inequality score for reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health intervention.

Reason for poor health condition Resource and systematic.

Other Reason for slow improvement in health parameter Out of Pocket Expenditure.

Way Forward The nature, scope and incidence of these problems naturally vary widely across the country

 

To understand importance of health sector we have to first understand Human capital

  • We all are aware that the population of India is more than a billion and it is still growing. It may overtake the population of China within the next couple of decades, eventually making India the most populous nation of the world.
  • Many of us believe that the population of India is a great problem thus population is quite often seen as a liability, a major hindrance to development and quality of life of the people.
  • But India is considered as a leading nation in the world in terms of human power. One of the major contributory factors for this global standing has been the young, educated and productive people of our country. They are contributing to the development of not only our country, but many of the foreign countries also. In this context, population is an asset for the economy, the greatest resource of the country rather than a liability.
  • But number of person is not the real and ultimate resource of a country until quality is not added to them.

 

What converts a population into a human capital?

  • For converting the Population into capital, the country has to invest a lot in the form of improving the health and nutritional status of the people, their education and specialized training and their overall quality of life.

 

Importance of health in human capital?

  • If a population is not healthy it will not contribute to its full potential in the development of the country. For example an unhealthy person even if highly educated and skilled would have to take frequent leave during job and during work time also it he or she will not be able to give its 100 per cent.
  • If women population is not healthy the children from them would also remain weak.
  • This population will become liability for the country rather than asset because they will not able to contribute fully in the development of the country; rather state has to take care of them.
  • It might result in increase in taxes as most of the countries are welfare state thus resource has to be arranged to look after the health needs of the unhealthy population.
  • Thus every country specially the developing and underdeveloped country needs to invest more in health sector; otherwise its population will became a liability rather than asset.

 

State of Health sector in India

  • The Indian health story has trended upwards going by the standard indicators of health. Besides significantly increasing the longevity of its citizens and keeping a check on its population, since independence, India has managed to rid itself of some major illnesses—small pox in 1975, polio in 2014, and maternal and neonatal tetanus in 2015.
  • However, with respect to meeting its potential health outcomes and relative performance, the country has faltered.

 

WHO world Health Report 2016

  • Among South-East Asian Region (SEAR) nations, India ranks the worst in the relative inequality score for reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health intervention.
  • (Relative inequality score- It is the ratio of mean coverage among the poorest populations to national average)
  • Child stunting, non-communicable diseases and mortality due to air pollution are other areas where the country fares poorly.
  • The world’s highest number of women dying in childbirth; the world’s highest deaths of children under the age of five; a health system that ranks 112 among 190 countries; one doctor for 1,700 people; 21% of the world’s burden of disease.

Doc2-1

 

Reason for poor health condition

There are two reasons for this:-

  1. Resource Related
  2. Systematic.

Resource related

  • While India has the fastest growing population, and an ambitious growth aspiration, it has always had a disproportionately small health budget. In 2015, this shrank further to 1.2% of the GDP, one of the stingiest in the world.

Systematic

  • But it isn’t simply a matter of the centre throwing more money at the problem. A look at the systemic issues will show that the current situation could be improved even with the available resource allocations.
  • First, India’s health services and health personnel, besides being grossly inadequate, are inequitably distributed across and within states. Rural-urban inequalities inevitably translate into differences in health outputs. For example, there is a 63% difference in infant mortality rates and 44% difference in total fertility rates of rural and urban areas in India.
  • Second, despite the considerable shift in the disease burden of India from communicable to non-communicable diseases, policy plans and funding have not altered in tandem.
  • For example a growing urban population of overweight and obese citizens co-existing with those suffering nutrient deficiency; diseases like diabetes which have a cascading effect on cardiovascular diseases; climate change-triggered bronchial disorders and mental disorders, have now become areas of increasing concern.
  • Moreover according to the recently released Lancet report on adolescent health;  suicide is the leading cause of death among youngsters aged 10-24 in the country. This is alarming since around 30% of India’s population falls within this group and India accounts for 15% of the global mental, neurological and substance use disorders in the world. The stigma associated with these issues coupled with a severe shortage of medical professionals in the field leads to sub-optimal health outcomes.
  • Third, the quality of our healthcare is in serious jeopardy due to a lack of regulation as well as well-trained medical professionals.

 

Other Reason for slow improvement in health parameter

  • Indians incurs huge out-of-pocket (OOP) health expenditure.
  • Private expenditure on health also includes insurance, donations and direct service payments by corporations. In India, 85.9% of private expenditure on health is OOP.

Out of Pocket expenditure

  • Out of pocket expenditure is any direct outlay by households, including gratuities and in-kind payments, to health practitioners and suppliers of pharmaceuticals, therapeutic appliances, and other goods and services whose primary intent is to contribute to the restoration or enhancement of the health status of individuals or population groups. It is a part of private health expenditure.
  • A report of the High Level Expert Group of the erstwhile Planning Commission had pointed out that 70% of the out of pocket expenditure on health are for drugs which leads to debate on the need for a free drugs programme funded by the government.
  • Out-of-pocket payments for health can cause households to incur catastrophic expenditures, which in turn can push them into poverty.

 

Way Forward

  • The nature, scope and incidence of these problems naturally vary widely across the country depending on economic conditions and development indicators of various states.
  • Eighty per cent of the 1% of GDP health allocation is raised and spent by states. In keeping with the shift towards greater fiscal devolution, there must be a dialogue about how health-spending programmes can give state governments the greatest possible control in fine-tuning their approach, based on local needs.
  • Policymakers after due consultation with states, must seriously reconsider improving the field of medicine and health sciences. There is also an urgent need to upgrade the curriculum in keeping with the changing disease spectrum and technological advances.
  • The Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana, 2014, aims to redress the problem of out of pocket expenditure by expanding the health insurance cover—currently, only 17% of the total population—but its effectiveness remains to be seen.
Categories
Exam Updates News

News: B S Bassi , ex Delhi Police Commissioner appointed UPSC Member

This year, as Kilemsungla Ma’am retired after the IFoS Interview ( she was not there for CSE Interview ), we have a new appointment to UPSC.

B S Bassi, former Delhi Police Commissioner has been appointed as the new member of UPSC.

Bassi Sir retired at the age of 60 this year in Feb, so as a UPSC Member , he will serve a very long tenure – which is six years or 65 years whichever happens earlier.

So Bassi Sir will be taking Interviews for CSE 2016 till CSE 2018. He will retire in Feb 2020 and will not be taking Interview for CSE 2019 , assuming that Interviews are held in around April.

Earlier, K K Paul Sir was a member of UPSC who was also former Delhi Police Commissioner.

Categories
Uncategorized

[Solution] – Tuesday Economy Quiz #10

Hello Everyone, These are the results and explanation of Tuesday Economy Quiz #10. Compare your answers and write your correct and incorrect in comment section. It will help to compare your performance with others.

[Solutions]

Q.1) Anti counterfeiting trade agreement is related with
a) Stopping Piracy of movies
b) Controlling duplication of products
c) Enforcement of Intellectual Property rights
d) None of the above

Ans – [C]

Explanation – The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) is a multinational treaty for the purpose of establishing international standards for intellectual property rights enforcement. The agreement aims to establish an international legal framework for targeting counterfeit goods, generic medicines and copyright infringement on the Internet, and would create a new governing body outside existing forums, such as the World Trade Organization, the World Intellectual Property Organization, and the United Nations.

Q.2) Consider the following statement with respect to newly printed one rupee note:
1. One rupee note is not a legal tender.
2. Satyamev Jayate will be written below the Ashokan Pillar.
3. It will be signed by the RBI governor.

Which of the above statements is/are correct?
a) 1 and 3 only
b) 2 and 3 only
c) 2 only
d) None of the above

Ans-[D]

Explanation- The Finance Ministry under the Central Government has recently launched the one rupee note again. The launch took place at the Shrinathji temple in Nathdwara, Rajasthan. The relaunched currency notes will be made up of cent percent cotton rag and will weigh 900 grams per square metre with a thickness of 110 microns. It bears the signature of the Finance Secretary and not the RBI Governor. Only Re. 1 notes and coins in India are signed by the Finance Secretary as they are printed by the Central Government. All other Indian currency notes in India are printed by RBI. The watermarks of the currency note include an Ashoka Pillar symbol in the window without the words ‘Satyamev Jayate’, a latent numeral at the centre and the concealed word ‘Bharat’ (in Hindi) at the right side of the note.

The colour of the note is primarily pink green on both the obverse and reverse sides, in combination with other colours. A picture of the oil exploration rig of Sagar Samrat off the Mumbai coast will feature on the reverse.

Q.3) Which of the following items has GI tags?
1. Hyderabad Haleem
2. Malabar Pepper
3. Coorg coffee
4. Kanchcipuram Silk saree

Select the correct answer using the codes given below.
a) 3 and 4 only
b) 1, 2 and 3 only
c) 1, 2, 3 and 4
d) 2 and 3 only

Ans-[C]

Explanation – All have GI tags attached to them.

Q.4) Consider the following statements about Asian Development Bank(ADB).
1. It is modeled on the lines of IMF.
2. Japan has the biggest subscribed capital in ADB.

Which of the above statement(s) is/are incorrect?
a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) Both 1 and 2
d) Neither 1 nor 2

Ans-[A]

Explanation– The Asian Development Bank was conceived in the early 1960s as a financial institution that would be Asian in character and foster economic growth and cooperation in one of the poorest regions in the world. ADB assists its members, and partners, by providing loans, technical assistance, grants, and equity investments to promote social and economic development. From 31 members at its establishment, ADB now has 67 members, of which 48 are from within Asia and the Pacific and 19 outside. The ADB was modeled closely on the World Bank, and has a similar weighted voting system where votes are distributed in proportion with members’ capital subscriptions. ADB releases an annual report that summarizes its operations, budget and other materials for review by the public. Japan has the biggest subscribed capital in ADB.

Q.5) Consider the following statements about WTO.
a) Ministerial conference is the highest decision making body
b) Each member country is officially represented by the Commerce minister.

Which of the above statement(s) is/are correct?
a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) Both 1 and 2
d) Neither 1 nor 2

Ans – [C]

Explanation – Both the statements are factual and correct.

Q.6) Global investment trade monitor report is released by
a) World economic forum
b)International monetary fund
c) World Bank
d ) UNCTAD

Ans-[D]

Q.7) What are the objectives of the taxation policy in India?
1. Directing investment into small scale sector
2. Reducing the consumption of luxury goods
3. Enforcement of law and order

Select the correct answer using the codes given below.
a) 1 and 2 only
b) 1 and 3 only
c) 2 and 3 only
d) 1,2 and 3

Ans-[D]

Explanation– This is very basic question. All three are objectives of the taxation policy of India.

Q.8)Consider the following statements.
1. Since 9th FYP there is consistent increase in the tax collection.
2. Tax collection after 1991 reforms declined initially.

Which of the above statements is/are correct?
a)1 only
b)2 only
c)Both 1 and 2
d)Neither 1 nor 2

Ans-[B]

Explanation-It was after 10 fyp that there was a consistent increase in the tax collection but this trend was broken after 2008 global financial meltdown. Statement 2 is right, as the economy was not robust just after 1991 reforms, there was a fall in tax collection initially.

Categories
Uncategorized

[Solution] – The 10 PM Daily Quiz – 30 May, 2016

solution

We posted 7 questions in 10 PM Daily Quiz on 30th May, 2016. Thanks for the amazing response. These questions will help you polish concepts based on current affairs. In case you have not attempted them, please attempt them by clicking below.


Q.1) Consider the following statements regarding Industrial Policy Resolution 1956

1.It  classified industries into two categories with respect to the role played by the State.

  1. It placed certain restrictions on undertakings belonging to large industrial houses, defined on the basis of assets exceeding Rs 350 mn.

Select the correct answer using the codes given below:

a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) Both 1 and 2
d) Neither 1 nor 2

Answer-a

Explanation:-

The Industrial Policy Resolution 1956 classified industries into three categories with respect to the role played by the State –

  • The first category (Schedule A) included industries whose future development would be the exclusive responsibility of the State
  • The second (Schedule B) category included Enterprises whose initiatives of development would principally be driven by the State but private participation would also be allowed to supplement the efforts of the State
  • And, the third category included the remaining industries, which were left to the private sector.

The Industrial Licensing Policy 1970 placed certain restrictions on undertakings belonging to large industrial houses, defined on the basis of assets exceeding Rs 350 mn.


Q.2) Consider the following statements regarding Public Sector Undertakings (PSUs)

  1. Public Sector Enterprises (PSEs)  are  classified into ‘strategic’ and ‘non-strategic’ industries.
  2. Public Sector Undertakings (PSUs) can be classified as Public Sector Enterprises (PSEs), Central Public Sector Enterprises (CPSEs) and Public Sector Banks (PSBs).

Select the correct answer using the codes given below:

a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) Both 1 and 2
d) Neither 1 nor 2

Answer-b

Explanation:- CLASSIFICATION OF PUBLIC SECTOR UNDERTAKINGS

  • Public Sector Undertakings (PSUs) can be classified as Public Sector Enterprises (PSEs), Central Public Sector Enterprises (CPSEs) and Public Sector Banks (PSBs).
  • The Central Public Sector Enterprises (CPSEs) are also classified into ‘strategic’ and ‘non-strategic’. Areas of strategic CPSEs are:
  • Arms & Ammunition and the allied items of defence equipments, defence air-crafts and warships
  • Atomic Energy (except in the areas related to the operation of nuclear power and applications of radiation and radio-isotopes to agriculture, medicine and non-strategic industries)
  • Railways transport.

All other CPSEs are considered as non-strategic.


Q.3) Consider the following statements regarding Geo-targeted advertising

  1. Geo targeting in geomarketing and internet marketing is the method of determining the geolocation of a website visitor and delivering different content to that visitor based on his or her location, such as country, region/state, city, metro code/zip code, organization, IP address, ISP or other criteria.
  2. It can also be done via television channels.

Select the correct answer using the codes given below:

a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) Both 1 and 2
d) Neither 1 nor 2

Answer-c

Explanation:- Geo targeting

  • Geo targeting in geomarketing and internet marketing is the method of determining the geolocation of a website visitor and delivering different content to that visitor based on his or her location, such as country, region/state, city, metro code/zip code, organization, IP address, ISP or other criteria.

Geo targeted advertisements on Television channels

  • Around 25 news and entertainment channels are beaming region-specific ads.
  • With the trend of geo-targeted advertising catching on, more companies are making use of technology to beam adverts to only areas where their products have strong presence.

Q.4) Consider the following statements Cloud computing

  1. Cloud computing is a type of computing that relies on sharing computing resources rather than having local servers or personald evices to handle applications.
  2. In cloud computing, the word cloud (also phrased as “the cloud”) is used as a metaphor for “the Internet”.

Select the correct answer using the codes given below:

a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) Both 1 and 2
d) Neither 1 nor 2

Answer-c

Explanation:

Cloud computing

Cloud computing is a type of computing that relies on sharing computing resources rather than having local servers or personald evices to handle applications.

Cloud computing is comparable to grid computing, a type of computing where unused processing cycles of all computers in a network are harnesses to solve problems too intensive for any stand-alone machine.

In cloud computing, the word cloud (also phrased as “the cloud”) is used as a metaphor for “the Internet,” so the phrase cloud computing means “a type of Internet-based computing,” where different services — such as servers, storage and applications —are delivered to an organization’s computers and devices through the Internet.


Q.5) Consider the following statements regarding train Talgo:

  1. Recently trial of Spanish train Talgo, the lighter and faster vehicle whose speed goes up to 115 km per hour, was conducted between Bareilly and Moradabad in Uttar Pradesh.
  2. Talgo’s lighter trains consume 30 per cent less energy.
  3. The Talgo train coaches are lightweight and designed in a way that it can run on curves without decelerating the speed.

Select the correct answer using the codes given below:

a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) 1 and 2 only
d) All of the above

Answer d

Explanation:-Click here.


Q.6) Consider the following statements 66 digital vans:

  1. 66 digital vans is a new government campaign, in which vans will be equipped with Internet and audio-visual facilities and will go to 657 districts by March 2017 to increase awareness about various e-governance services in rural and semi-urban areas.
  2. State governments, along with the Department of Posts, Department of Telecommunications (BSNL) and CSC-SPV, will play an active role in the execution of this campaign.
  3. A district level committee, headed by the District Collector, will foresee its ground level execution to ensure that the maximum benefit is generated out of this campaign.

Select the correct answer using the codes given below:

a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) 1 and 2 only
d) All of the above

Answer d
Explanation:- Click here.


Q.7) Consider the statements regarding ASHA:

  1. Accredited Social Health Activist ASHAs have been engaged under the National Rural Health Mission
  2. Function of an ASHA is to establish a link between the community and the health system.
  3. ASHA is the first port of call for any health related demands of deprived sections of the population, especially women and children, who find it difficult to access health services in rural areas.

Select the correct answer using the codes given below:

a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) 1 and 2 only
d) All of the above

Answer: d
Explanation:- All of the above statements are correct.

Categories
Events TopperSpeak

ForumIAS Community Meet – Summer 2016

 

 

Thank you all for making the ForumIAS Community Summer Meet – 2016 a success! ForumIAS User @carzyphoton , Gaurav Agarwal , Rank 1, 2013 came to felicitate 2015 IAS Toppers from ForumIAS.

 

This is the first Video , where Gaurav has shared few words on Life as an IAS Officer. The video ends with felicitation by Gaurav Agarwal.

Thanks Siddhartha Jain ( Rank 13) , Pulkit ( Rank 27) , Abhishek Pandey (31) , Harsh (43), Arushi (294), Shilpi ( 198), Jatin Lal (42) , Richie Pandey (52) , Atul Vats (60) , Nitin Gaur (69) , Narendra Shah (86), Mukul (87), Nikhil Pathak (107), Sudhanshu Dhama(115),  Sagarika Nath (199) , Kartik Dubey (229) , Aman Mittal (231) , Prabodh Sharma (284) , Vivek Chauhan (300) , Megha Bansal (391) , Ankit Agarwal (494) , Rahul Kumar (442) , Sharavan (651), Guru Prasad (749), Sonakshi Tomar (747) ,  Abhishek Kumar (1028) , Anjani Kumar Singh (IFS ), Vipul (IFS 49), Mahatim Yadav ( IFS) and many others who turned up for the event to make it really meaningful.

Lastly, thanks to ForumIAS members who turned up for the event and laying the foundation for Many more such Meets.

Categories
Newspaper

Newspaper Must Read Articles of the Day – 31 May, 2016

31-may

Newspaper articles bearing relevance to Civil Services preparation 

The Hindu 


National


Hacking scare leads to norms for smartphones {Security – Paper III}

‘Nations need a say in peace keeping’ {International Institutions – Paper II}

Water sensing from the skies in pipeline {Science and Tech – Paper III}

Soon, postman will also deliver Ganga Jal {e- Governance – Paper III}


Opinions & Editorials 

The right to intervene {International Relations – Paper II}

Grappling with our prejudices {Foreign Policy – Paper II}

The MGNREGA index {Govt Policies – Paper II}



International



Business & Economy

India climbs three notches in global competitiveness {Economy – Paper III}


Indian Express – Opinion & Editorial

Raja Mandala: Regional India, global South Asia {Foreign Policy – Paper II}


 Livemint

The lurking threat of inflation {Indian Economy – Paper III}

Diagnosing India’s growing health problem {Indian Economy – Paper III}

Measuring Mudra’s success {Indian Economy – Paper III}

Categories
Uncategorized

Tuesday Economy Quiz #10

Hello Everyone, Here are the set of questions on Economy. Attempt this quiz and write your  answer in comment section. We will publish the result with detailed explanation at 5 PM.

[Questions]

Q.1) Anti counterfeiting trade agreement is related with
a) Stopping Piracy of movies
b) Controlling duplication of products
c) Enforcement of Intellectual Property rights
d) None of the above

Q.2) Consider the following statement with respect to newly printed one rupee note:
1. One rupee note is not a legal tender.
2. Satyamev Jayate will be written below the Ashokan Pillar.
3. It will be signed by the RBI governor.

Which of the above statements is/are correct?
a) 1 and 3 only
b) 2 and 3 only
c) 2 only
d) None of the above

Q.3) Which of the following items has GI tags?
1. Hyderabad Haleem
2. Malabar Pepper
3. Coorg coffee
4. Kanchcipuram Silk saree

Select the correct answer using the codes given below.
a) 3 and 4 only
b) 1, 2 and 3 only
c) 1, 2, 3 and 4
d) 2 and 3 only

Q.4) Consider the following statements about Asian Development Bank(ADB).
1. It is modeled on the lines of IMF.
2. Japan has the biggest subscribed capital in ADB.

Which of the above statement(s) is/are incorrect?
a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) Both 1 and 2
d) Neither 1 nor 2

Q.5) Consider the following statements about WTO.
a) Ministerial conference is the highest decision making body
b) Each member country is officially represented by the Commerce minister.

Which of the above statement(s) is/are correct?
a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) Both 1 and 2
d) Neither 1 nor 2

Q.6) Global investment trade monitor report is released by
a) World economic forum
b)International monetary fund
c) World Bank
d ) UNCTAD

Q.7) What are the objectives of the taxation policy in India?
1. Directing investment into small scale sector
2. Reducing the consumption of luxury goods
3. Enforcement of law and order

Select the correct answer using the codes given below.
a) 1 and 2 only
b) 1 and 3 only
c) 2 and 3 only
d) 1,2 and 3

Q.8)Consider the following statements.
1. Since 9th FYP there is consistent increase in the tax collection.
2. Tax collection after 1991 reforms declined initially.

Which of the above statements is/are correct?
a)1 only
b)2 only
c)Both 1 and 2
d)Neither 1 nor 2