Categories
9 PM Daily NEWS Brief

9 PM Daily Brief – 25 Nov 2016

 

  • Front Page / NATIONAL

  1. Govt. ends exchange of old notes
  2. Rs. 400 cr. in fake notes to be flushed out’
  • INTERNATIONAL

  1. As India retaliates, Pakistan moves UN
  • Editorial/OPINION

  1. The new abnormal in Kashmir
  2. The Marrakech mandate
  3. No country for the Rohingyas
  4. The state of the stateless
  • ECONOMY

  1. Notes ban to significantly disrupt economic activity: Moody’s
  • Indian Express

  1. India’s golden moment
  2. A change called NeHA
  3. Pale green
  • Live Mint

  1. Muddling through Marrakech

Click here to Download 9 PM Daily Brief (25th November 2016) 


Front Page / NATIONAL


[1]. Govt. ends exchange of old notes

The Hindu

Context
Article deals with announcements and news related to demonetization

What has happened?
The exchange of the high-value notes of Rs. 500 and Rs. 1,000 over the counter at banks and post-offices has, however, been stopped with immediate effect.
• Exemption to use Rs 500 notes has been extended till 15th December now. These can still be used to pay fees at government schools and colleges as well as for the purchase of pre-paid mobile top-ups
• Now, Rs 1000 would not be exchanged and could only be deposited into accounts unlike Rs 500 which can still be used at certain avenues
• Purchases from consumer co-operative stores with old currency notes have now been limited to Rs 5000 at a time, while foreign citizens can now exchange foreign currency up to Rs 5000 per week

RBI advisory
Reserve Bank of India (RBI) issued an advisory to banks to ensure adequate cash to meet the likely demand of government officials and pensioners and similarly, provide adequate supply at the military outposts for the cash requirements of armed forces personnel.

[2]. ‘Rs. 400 cr. in fake notes to be flushed out’

The Hindu

Context
Centre’s affidavit before SC says counterfeits are used to fuel terror.

What has happened?
A 27-page affidavit filed by the Centre in the Supreme Court said one of the chief reasons for demonetisation of over Rs. 14 lakh crore was to flush out counterfeit currency (estimated to be Rs. 400 crore) used to fuel terrorism, anti-national activities and communal riots

In the affidavit centre has submitted that,
• The impact of each terror event is catastrophic and disproportionately higher than the amount of terror financing. The amount spent to sponsor a terrorist act may not be very large, but the impact and damage it causes to human lives and to the economy is catastrophic
• Constant confrontations at the northern and north-eastern border States describe how black money funneled through a “parallel shadow economy” had threatened to destabilize the country
• The list of threats to national security, include“trans-border terrorism, left-wing extremism, espionage, sabotage, insurgencies, activities of organised crime syndicates, organised criminal groups, drugs syndicates, gun-running, human-trafficking, abetment of communal riots


INTERNATIONAL


[1]. As India retaliates, Pakistan moves UN

The Hindu

Context
Alarmed by the escalation of tension with India along the Line of Control (LoC), Pakistan on Thursday asked the U.N. to act before the situation became a “full-fledged crisis.”

Pakistan has alleged that
• The situation posed a grave threat to international peace and security
• Escalating tension “was a deliberate attempt” by India to “divert the attention of the international community from the gross human right violations being committed” by it in Kashmir

UN Military Observer Group in India and Pakistan (UNMOGIP)
The U.N. Department of Peace Keeping Operations was separately asked to mobilize the United Nations Military Observer Group in India and Pakistan to effectively monitor the LoC and the working boundary as a step to help ease the tension

Read More: UNMOGIP


Editorial/OPINION


[1]. The new abnormal in Kashmir

The Hindu

Context
Author, a famous economist, tries to paint a picture for us of the present ground level situation in Kashmir. He ends his article with a warning that if the situation is allowed to worsen then it might lead to further alienation of Kashmir and Kashmiris from India.

Article is a commentary on actual situation prevailing in Kashmir right now. Author states that Indian government should relinquish the policy of clamping down on protests and start making positive moves like unconditional talks with all the stakeholders involved.

Author says that at present Hurriyat leaders enjoy popular support as youngsters and other Kashmiris follow their protest calendar diligently. The response of Indian government to such protests is of zero tolerance.

Author says that arresting Hurryiat leaders only intensifies the desire for freedom.

Such a policy, author states, will further alienate Kashmir from India & initiating unconditional talks is the only right policy now.

Read more: Jean Dreze

[2]. The Marrakech mandate

The Hindu

Context
As world leaders gathered in Marrakech (November 7-18) to discuss the implementation of the Paris Agreement at the 22nd session of the Conference of the Parties (COP-22), the election of a leader in the U.S. who has disavowed climate change cast a pall on the deliberations.

Marrakech conference has already been covered in brief dated 11th November 2016, 22nd November 2016

Articles related to Marrakech, henceforth, shall only contain new points, not covered in previous briefs.

Climate vulnerable forum
Author states that one of the remarkable announcements at the Marrakech COP was the pledge by the Climate Vulnerable Forum, comprising 48 least developed countries, including Bangladesh, Ethiopia and South Sudan, to get 100 per cent of their energy from renewables by 2050
Read More: Climate Vulnerable Forum

Commitment by Under2s
165 sub-national jurisdictions, calling themselves the Under2s, announced that they would reduce their emissions by 80-95 per cent below 1990 levels and limit their per capita emissions to under 2 tonnes of carbon dioxide by 2050
Read More: Under2s

Science based targets
Science Based Targets initiative got a boost in Marrakech when over 200 companies worldwide committed to emissions reductions targets
Read more:Science based targets

Warsaw international mechanism for loss and damage
With regard to the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage, the framework for a five-year rolling work plan was approved
• Since adaptation has limitations, this is a global mechanism to provide support to countries that sustain ongoing and future harm from climate change
• Aim: The aim will be to address issues such as extreme events, non-economic losses, displacement, migration, slow-moving climatic changes and risk management

[3]. No country for the Rohingyas

The Hindu

Context
A new humanitarian crisis is unfolding in Myanmar after the military crackdown on “Islamist jihadists” in the Rakhine State, home to more than one million Rohingya Muslims

The Rohingya crisis has been covered in the brief dated 24th November 2016

Just give it a go through once.

[4]. The state of the stateless

The Hindu

Context
For a country that gained independence with a mass exchange of populations, India’s treatment of refugees has much to improve upon.

Chakmas
Author begins by describing the story of Chakmas, how 40,000 Chakma families emigrated to India when Pakistan built the Kaptai dam in 1962 and their gradual resettlement in Arunachal Pradesh which was followed by anti-immigrant stirs. Author states that it was only in 2015 after SC directions that Chakmas were given citizenships

Refugees in India
Author states that India hosts over 2,00,000 refugees, victims of civil strife and war in Tibet, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Myanmar
• Tibetan refugees: Some refugees, the Tibetans who arrived between 1959 and 1962, were given adequate refuge in over 38 settlements, with all privileges provided to an Indian citizen excluding the right to vote
• Afghan refugees: The Afghan refugees fleeing the civil war in the 1980s live in slums across Delhi with no legal status or formal documents to allow them to work or establish businesses in India
• Rohingyas: Author states that at present over 13000 Rohingya refugees are registered with UNHCR in India and around 700 of those reside in Delhi in deplorable conditions. They cannot send their children to school because of lack of documentation and are mostly engaged as daily wage laborers
• Refugees from East Pakistan: Refugees from East Pakistan in 1947 were settled in Dandakaranya, Odisha, a tribal-majority forested region. The refugees, accustomed to plain and semiaquatic agriculture, found it hard to farm in such rugged terrain. Ethnic clashes soon broke out over land distribution and assistance provided to refugees. After decades of penury, the refugees left for Marichjhapi Island in the Sunderbans. The State government responded with forcible eviction, economically blockading them and conducting police firing on a random basis
• Nepali-speaking population in Bhutan: Fears of demographic change led to the expulsion of the Nepali-speaking population in Bhutan in the 1990s. Over 100000 people made their way to Nepal, passing through India. Over 20,000 refugees continue to live in India, on the margins of society, with no legal status and no citizenship. They remain stateless

Non-signatory
Author states that India remains non-signatory to 1951 United Nations Refugee Convention and the 1967 Protocol, which help define the legal obligation of states to protect refugees.

Protected by Judiciary
• Refugees have been accorded constitutional protection by the judiciary (National Human Rights Commission vs State of Arunachal Pradesh, 1996)
• Supreme Court has held that the right to equality (Article 14) and right to life and personal liberty (Article 21) extends to refugees
• The Foreigners Act (1946) and the Registration of Foreigners Act (1939) currently govern the entry and exit of all refugees, treating them as foreigners without due consideration of their special circumstances

Duty of a democratic country
Author states that it is the duty of the state to ensure that
• Formal recognition: Any refugee, whose grant of asylum has been approved, should be given a formal recognition of his/her asylum status along with an identity document and a travel document
• Refugees should be able to apply for residence permits, and be able to choose their place of residence across India
• Documentsof the refugees enable them to seek employment in the private sector.
• Primary education should be offered on no-charge basis in government schools, while primary healthcare services available to Indian citizens should be offered as well.

Social sensitisation
Simply announcing policies won’t solve the matter. Society needs to be made aware of the issue and its deeper connotations.Following steps can be taken,
• Acceptance of refugee cards: Institutions, private and public, should be encouraged to recognise UNHCR-issued refugee cards, in addition to foreign degrees or diplomas
• Sensitizing at local level: Local municipal corporations should be asked to sensitize neighbourhood associations to accept refugees who can pay, along with conducting integration workshops for youth and women empowerment initiatives
• Adequate data: There is a paucity of data related to refugees in India which leads to misrepresentation and exaggeration in national and local media. Registration processes like Aadhar can be extended to refugees too.

Conclusion
Author concludes by saying that a transparent system to deal with refugees in India needs to be developed which simultaneously balances India’s security considerations too.


ECONOMY


[1]. Notes ban to significantly disrupt economic activity: Moody’s

The Hindu

Context
Demonetisation will “significantly disrupt economic activity” and lead to weaker growth in near-term, though in the long run it can boost tax revenues and translate into faster fiscal consolidation.

What has happened?
Moody, the credit rating agency, has come out with a report titled Indian Credit — Demonetisation Is Beneficial for Indian Government and Banks; Implementation Challenges Will Disrupt Economic Activity

Observations of the report
1. Banks are the key beneficiaries: The move to ban old Rs 500/1000 notes is affecting all sectors of the economy to various extent, with banks being the key beneficiaries
2. Beneficial in the long run: Although the measures in the near term will pressure GDP growth and thereby government revenues, in the longer term they should boost tax revenues and translate into higher government capital expenditure and/or faster fiscal consolidation
3. Loss of wealth: There will be a loss of wealth for individuals and corporates with unreported income, as some will choose not to deposit funds back into the formal financial system to avoid disclosing the sources of these funds
4. Weaker GDP growth: In the immediate period, demonetisation would “significantly disrupt economic activity, resulting in temporarily weaker consumption and GDP growth
5. Cash crunch: Households and businesses will experience liquidity shortages as cash is taken out of the system, with a daily limit on the amount in old notes that can be exchanged into new notes
6. Broadening the tax base
7. In the medium term, the impact on corporates will depend on how quickly liquidity returns to the system and transaction flows are restored
8. Gradual change in consumer habits: Consumption in India is still largely cash-driven, and a move towards digital payments would require a likely gradual change in consumer habits
9. Lowering of lending rates: Rising bank deposits could lower lending rates, a positive for the banks
10. Asset quality deterioration: In the nearer term Moody’s expects asset quality to deteriorate for banks and non-bank finance companies, as the economic disruption will significantly impact the ability of borrowers to repay loans, in particular for the loans against property, commercial vehicles and micro finance sectors.


Indian Express


[1]. India’s golden moment

Indian Express
Demonetisation is an ethical step. It can help us leave behind culture of illegality, indiscipline, ill-gotten wealth.

A comprehensive article on Demonetisation and its different aspects and dimensions will be created by Forumias

Just give it a go through once.

[2]. A change called NeHA

Indian Express

Context
The proposed National e-Health Authority, which will oversee digitization of health information, could launch a digital health revolution in India. But safeguards need to be in place to protect patients’ privacy.

Medical records
Author begins by highlighting the power of digital communication, how technology has changed the way we shop, eat and transfer money but he points out that the health-services in India have remained largely unaffected.
Problem: vast majority of Indians haveno organised medical records, whether paper or electronic

Proposed solution: The Government of India is now scheduled to launch the National e-Health Authority (NeHA). A regulatory body, tasked with overseeing the digitisation of health information.

Developing a healthcare ecosystem
Author says that variety of apps can be developed for patients, doctors, researchers, and policy makers — an app to remind mothers to vaccinate their children, push notifications to remind you to take your medication, or an alert that you are traveling to an epidemic belt
• Scientists could search through hundreds of millions of records to find cures and validate current practices
• Policymakers would be able to conduct disease surveillance and formulate public health interventions
• Timely access: Clinicians and patients would have timely access to their records
Challenges
• The poor uptake of electronic records by doctors in India
• The lack of inter-operability between systems and devices
• The legitimate concern for privacy, security and safety of medical data

Solutions that can be adopted under NeHA
• Keep it simple: To get doctors to adopt electronic medical records (EMRs), any proposed systems must be easy to use and affordable. Careful attention must be paid to human-centered design and data minimization (collecting only the data you need). Needless and cumbersome billing tools should not be developed as it will lead to dissatisfaction amongst physicians and doctors
• Inter-operable: The systems developed should be inter-operable meaning they should be able to exchange information with each other. For example, if one hospital runs a software A and another runs a software system B then both of the should be able to exchange information with each other in case a patient gets transferred or switches from one hospital to another
• Control of access: Author says that legitimate concerns of privacy and data security must be taken into consideration before a nation-wide system is developed. Proper laws mandating to building safeguards to protect the patients must be included.

Conclusion
Author concludes by saying that all the necessary ingredients i.e. a digital health Greenfield (scope of development), robust telecom infrastructure, unique ID authentication, and a large talented pool of IT professionals. Utilizing them may allow India to shape healthcare delivery globally.

[3]. Pale green

Indian Express

Context
NGT’s directive for environmental audit of government buildings can achieve little in a country with weak norms.

What has happened?
The National Green Tribunal ordered an environmental audit of all government buildings in Delhi, including offices and hospitals, to control pollution
• Court said that the audit will keep to the “bare minimum” and it does not expect green building standards from the premises it will be investigating

Weak NBC norms
Author states that any such audit is an exercise riddled with failure because the National Building Code (NBC) does not incorporate green standards, which means that it is not incumbent upon a builder to make environment friendly structures
• The NBC does not include water or material efficiency standards. It does have standards for energy efficiency but compliance is voluntary

Green building initiatives in India
The three green building certification programmes in the country, are not a government initiative,
1. The Indian Council of Green Building (ICGB) rating: ICGB is a part of Confederation of Indian Industry (CII)
2. Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment (GRIHA): TERI (The Energy and Resources Institute) has developed GRIHA (Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment), which was adopted as the national rating system for green buildings by the Government of India in 2007
3. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED): It has been developed by the non-profit US Green Building Council

Minimum oversight but incentives given
Author says that although the government has very little oversight over the three programmes
But that does not prevent state governments across the country from giving concessions to buildings that claim to adhere to LEED and GRIHA criteria.
• These incentives include permission to increase the built-up area
• No compliance mechanism: Most times, these concessions are given without proper monitoring of the actual energy and resource savings in such buildings. There is no mechanism to ensure compliance

Leading by example: Maharashtra
Author says that Maharashtra government has opted for fiscal incentives that can be withdrawn if a building underperforms on the green rating criteria

Way ahead
Author says that much more needs to be done to ensure that green building criteria are not mindlessly followed in India because criteria like LEED developed in the west cater to the climatic conditions prevailing there. The environmental conditions in India are vastly different. For example: Construction of vast glass buildings might be suitable for cold countries but for countries like India they act as heat traps leading to unnecessary expense of air conditioning and other expenses to keep it cool

Conclusion
Ensuring that buildings comply with green norms will require much more than a NGT directive. The country needs stronger and better norms as a first step to green buildings.

Read more: LEED, GRIHA, ICGB


Live Mint


[1]. Muddling through Marrakech

Live Mint

Context
Perceptions and assessments of climate governance mirror the growing view on the negative experiences of globalization.

Marrakech conference has already been covered in brief dated 11th November 2016, 22nd November 2016

Further, some new points have also been included in today’s The Hindu editorial.

Give this article a light read.



Categories
Mains Marathon

Video Answer Writing Tips for Mains: How to begin

It was wonderful to have ForumIAS members attempt the MainsOpen Mock last Saturday – Sunday, in Rajinder Nagar, New Delhi. Mango Dolly came. So did Yoga123. And Yo_Yo.

Yoga123 chose IRS over IPS last year, and it was good to see both IRS officers debate over the impact of GST on their respective career choices.

But that wasn’t the thing, why I wrote this last moment before the exam post on a Friday night. There were some key lessons , which we all can learn from last Sunday’s test.

I have pretty much covered it in THIS video below, where I have discussed most things. I had assumed everyone knew, so never shared it publicly.

That maybe because I have limited interaction with first timers, as most people I try to help out are in the advanced stage of their preparation.

However, I felt that even people writing Mains year on year, made the same mistakes. Probably every year. So what I am going to share with you is something that one figures out , by luck, naturally in the first attempt, or by experience – in the fourth attempt.

I think, if you have just begun, it should help you develop lot of clarity, especially , if you plan to begin writing for Mains Marathon 2017 or plan to join some Mains Test Series – or even if you are writing Mains this year. This year, Interviews are going to be early, so do connect soon after the Mains, to begin Interview prep as well – all of you who are writing Mains 2016.

Note : This was recorded after a session by Harsh ( 1st Attempt, 43 Rank, 413 marks in GS ) and Narendra Shah ( Already in IIS, 4rth Attempt, 390+ marks in GS ), so I keep referring to them. This happened in New Delhi, sometime in the month of August.

Please download this file, and go through it once, before you start to watch the video, so that it makes more sense.

 

 

https://player.vimeo.com/video/182372500

 

Let me know if it helped. Sorry in advance if what I have said is already obvious to many. It should be.

Until next time,

Neyawn

 

Categories
Daily Editorials for UPSC IAS Exam Preparation

Daily Editorial – The Rohingya crisis explained

 

editorials


  • The Rohingya crisis explained

  1. Context

  2. Facts 

  3. The issue

  4. Problems faced by Rohingyas

  5. Response from states Involved

  6. Way ahead

 


Click here to Download Daily Editorial (25  Nov 2016)


Context


Military crackdown on “Islamist jihadists” in the Rakhine State after three border security posts came under attack on October 9 , as claimed by the military . This has given rise to a new wave of migration of Rohingyas to neighbouring countries.

  • Rohingyas have often been called the most persecuted minorities in the World.
  • They represent a muslim minority that primarily resides in Rakhine State (western Myanmar)
  • Hundreds of people have already died this year while over 30,000 have been displaced.

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Facts 


  • 40000-50000 rohingyas are living in india , 13000 are registered with UNHCR. Rohingyas crossing over from Bangladesh to India prefer the camps in Jammu, Hyderabad and Delhi because of religious similarity and economic opportunity.
  • According to the United Nations by 2015 ,120,000 of them have been forced to flee Myanmar in the last three years
  • They migrate mostly towards indonesia,thailand,malaysia and bangladesh.
  • There are now 30,000 documented Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh , but their numbers go above 3-4lakh.

The issue


  • The Rohingya people are considered “stateless entities”, as the Myanmar government has been refusing to recognise them as one of the ethnic groups of the country.
  • The government sees them as Bengali Muslims from Bangladesh who migrated there during the colonial period (and continue to do so)
  • The Rohingya see themselves as Muslim natives of Arakan (Rakhine), a state in Myanmar.
  • Bengali Muslims in Bangladesh and India do not see the Rohingya as their kin in any respect.
  • They are not considered Burmese citizens under the Citizenship Law for the last four decades .Hence,they lack legal protection from the Government of Myanmar.
  • Buddhist nationalists in Myanmar call Rohingya illegal immigrants from Bangladesh.
  • They are regarded as mere refugees from Bangladesh and face strong hostility in there .
  • None of the involved states is a signatory to the 1951 Refugee Convention, nor its 1967 Protocol.
  • Many rohingyas are confused with bangladeshis who are migrating because of economic reasons.

Problems faced by Rohingyas


  • Rohingyas have lived in poverty in Western Myanmar for decades. They have no freedom of movement, access to healthcare facilities or education and their right to vote was revoked earlier in 2015
  • The lack of a formal regional asylum framework has made the Rohingyas emergency more acute and tragic.
  • Thousands of starving men, women and children remain stranded for months at sea on fragile vessels whenever their traffickers left them or countries refused to take them in.
  • There are reports of the discovery of the mass graves of trafficked people in Thailand and Malaysia.
  • There are many cases when the traffickers took the migrants lending them in Thailand and moved them across the Malaysian border, usually after being tortured until their families paid a ransom.
  • Reports of sale of trafficked migrants as slaves to Thai fishing vessels to produce sea food.
  • The ‘global war on terror’ has legitimised anti-Muslim sentiments , attacks or indifference towards them.

Response from states Involved


  • Myanmar’s government has this year set up an advisory panel headed by former U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan to find “lasting solutions” to the conflict in Rakhine state.
  • Resettlement plan being put to practice by the Myanmarese government demands proof of residence for the past 60 years before granting them naturalised citizenship .
  • Bangladesh- has tightened border patrols in the face of the influx of the refugees and has asked Myanmar to take them back.
  • Australia – has been refusing to take the rohingyas coming from indonesia , refused settlement to earlier migrants who had arrived by boat.
  • New NLD government in Myanmar has been largely ineffective in tackling internal security and humanitarian issues . The army still remains a powerful institution.

There has never been a word from indian side towards the plight of Rohingyas.


Way ahead


  • Need of regional refugee framework , where all countries have to come to a consensus with realisation that though there is a pull factor in determining their destination they are risking life at sea for an uncertain future which is not a very attractive prospect.
  • Any refugee, whose grant of asylum has been approved, should be given a formal recognition of his/her asylum status along with an identity document , residence permits , employment permits.
  • Social sensitization of the people of Myanmar, of the neighbouring countries towards the plight of these people is a necessary step.


Categories
Mains Marathon

Download: Mains Marathon – October Compilation


mains-marathon


Dear Aspirants,

Here is the Mains Marathon- October compilation. Download the compiled file of ForumIAS Mains Marathon (October) Compilation here:

 

Click on the image below to Download:



To Download Mains Marathon – August and September Compilation Click Here


All the Best for Mains 2016 🙂


 

Categories
Mains 2016 Initiative

Mains 2016: Mitochondrial Donation Technology


Mitochondrial Donation Technology


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World’s first child with new three-parent technique (spindle transfer) was born this year in Mexico.


Mitochondrial Donation or Mitochondrial


manipulation technology (MMT) is a form of in vitro fertilization in which the future baby’s mitochondrial DNA comes from a third party apart from mother and father. This is a controversial technique because mitochondria contain genetic makeup and using the mitochondria from a third party means the genetic makeup of the baby has 3 parent.

This is a controversial technique because mitochondria contain genetic makeup and using the mitochondria from a third party means the genetic makeup of the baby has 3 parents.

Applications: Used in cases when mothers carry genetic mitochondrial diseases Cases where other IVF technologies do not work


Mitochondrial disease


 Mitochondria is known as powerhouse of the cell, producing energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) Mitochondrial DNA is made up of 37 genes, making up <0.1% of our body’s total DNA. Mitochondrial dysfunction is due to mutations in either nuclear or mitochondrial DNA sequences.


Techniques used in MMT


  1. Spindle transfer 

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  • In this technique, the unfertilized mother’s egg which has abnormal mitochondria is taken and the spindle and other chromosomes are removed from it.
  • They are then transferred to the unfertilized donor’s egg with healthy mitochondria.
  • This reconstituted egg is then fertilized with sperm from the father.

Pronuclear transfer 


  • In this case, both the mother’s egg which contains abnormal mitochondria and the donated egg which contains normal mitochondria are first fertilized with father’s sperm.
  • Then the mother’s pro nuclei is removed and transferred into the donor’s egg.
  • It is then implanted into the mother’s uterus.

1


Social and ethical issues


  • Though the third part constitutes only 0.1% of the genetic makeup. People opposing it say it
    has psychological and physical effects which provide god like powers to the scientists.
  •  It involves modification of the germ-line which is then inherited by the later generations.
  • This can lead to genetically modified i.e. designer babies where certain traits are changed or fixed.
  • Safety issues may arise when some abnormal mitochondria is left.
  • Techniques like pronuclear transfer involve creating and then destroying an embryo in the process.
  • It raises questions about the identity of the individual, thus it has the potential to cause
    disruption in the society.
  • As scientists keep gaining the huge power to change the genetic makeup of future babies, question of access to the technology depending on income inequality gains importance.


 

Categories
Newspaper

Must Read News Articles – November 25


Archives


must-read


The Hindu


Front Page / NATIONAL


Govt. ends exchange of old notes: In further modifications to use and exchange of the demonetised Rs. 500 and Rs. 1,000 notes, the Centre on Thursday extended the exemptions for the use of Rs. 500 notes till December 15.

‘Rs. 400 cr. in fake notes to be flushed out’: Centre’s affidavit before SC says counterfeits are used to fuel terror.


INTERNATIONAL


As India retaliates, Pakistan moves UN: Alarmed by the escalation of tension with India along the Line of Control (LoC), Pakistan on Thursday asked the U.N. to act before the situation became a “full-fledged crisis.”

After DGMOs talk, border becomes quiet: Jammu and Kashmir on Thursday witnessed an eerie calm on the Line of Control (LoC) and the International Border (IB), a day after the Directors-General of Military Operations (DGMOs) of India and Pakistan revived a hotline to discuss the deteriorating situation.


Editorial/OPINION


The new abnormal in Kashmir: Continued repression is likely to intensify the alienation in Kashmir. It would be much wiser for the government to realise the futility of stonewalling and initiate unconditional talks with all concerned.

The Marrakech mandate: As world leaders gathered in Marrakech (November 7-18) to discuss the implementation of the Paris Agreement at the 22nd session of the Conference of the Parties (COP-22), the election of a leader in the U.S. who has disavowed climate change cast a pall on the deliberations.

No country for the Rohingyas: A new humanitarian crisis is unfolding in Myanmar after the military crackdown on “Islamist jihadists” in the Rakhine State, home to more than one million Rohingya Muslims.

The state of the stateless: For a country that gained independence with a mass exchange of populations, India’s treatment of refugees has much to improve upon.


ECONOMY


Notes ban to significantly disrupt economic activity: Moody’s: Demonetisation will “significantly disrupt economic activity” and lead to weaker growth in near-term, though in the long run it can boost tax revenues and translate into faster fiscal consolidation.

Rupee slumps to record low; nears 69/dollar: Reserve Bank of India intervenes by selling dollars through state-run banks, cushioning local currency’s drop.


Indian Express


India’s golden moment: Demonetisation is an ethical step. It can help us leave behind culture of illegality, indiscipline, ill-gotten wealth.

A change called NeHA: The proposed National e-Health Authority, which will oversee digitization of health information, could launch a digital health revolution in India. But safeguards need to be in place to protect patients’ privacy.

Pale green: NGT’s directive for environmental audit of government buildings can achieve little in a country with weak norms.


Live Mint


Muddling through Marrakech: Perceptions and assessments of climate governance mirror the growing view on the negative experiences of globalization.