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Must Read News Articles – February 2


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The Hindu


Front Page / NATIONAL and ECONOMY


SMALL WONDER: In a workmanlike Budget, Arun Jaitley maintains fiscal discipline while handing out more to those at the bottom of the pyramid.

₹2,000 ceiling for cash donation to parties: But individuals can give funds by cheque or through digital mode.

I-T relief for those earning ₹2.5-5 lakh: Uniform benefit of ₹12,500 per person for all other categories of taxpayers.

A fine balance of growth and equity: The Union budget for 2017-18 has managed a fine balance between growth and equity based on strategic thrust areas.

Infrastructure gets a major boost: As the Budget is a combined one, the Centre can now synergise investments in rail, roads, rivers and civil aviation.

Safety comes first, e-tickets gain traction: Corpus of ₹1 lakh crore for safety and zero service charge on digital bookings major highlights of rail budget.

Payments board may get a MPC lookalike: Centre will review the Payment and Settlement Systems Act, 2007, and bring about amendments.


Editorial/OPINION


Politics trumps ideology: The macroeconomic credentials of the Budget are quite impressive. The highlight is a greater than 25% increase in capital spending and a substantial increase in the transfer to the States.

Readying for the long road: The Budget for this fiscal year is a balanced one which takes forward the work done in 2016-2017.

The message in the median: The fiscal prudence is timely, but the Budget lacks measures to revive the economy.


Indian Express


More Water For The Field: But silence on reforming food and fertiliser subsidies is disappointing.


Live Mint


Union Budget: more hits than misses: The government has taken several reform measures in the budget that will help the economy.

Budget 2017: An opportunity lost for renewable energy: The budget’s real test lay in its approach to mitigating financial risk in the renewable energy, where capital costs are high, payback periods are long and off-taker, construction and foreign exchange risks raise cost of debt.


 

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