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Mission Mains 2020: GS 1

This is for those of you who are planning to write Mains 2020. Primarily, the agenda of this thread would be 

1. Answer Writing Practice

2. Sharing examples - anecdotes from Current affairs relevant for Answer writing

3. Any doubts wrt. Paper 1!

Feel free to pool in your suggestions!

jack_Sparrow , Rise from Ashes and 24 others like this
14.7k views

79 comments

“Juvenile delinquency is an outcome of the upheaval that has affected the traditional ways of life in the congenial socio-cultural milieu” Analyse (150 words) (10 marks)

2.6k views
Hi, is there any common books or reports that aspirants are referring while studying for GS Mains 1 2 3? Can you please guide me to it?
2.5k views
Hi, is there any common books or reports that aspirants are referring while studying for GS Mains 1 2 3? Can you please guide me to it?

No common book that I referred to. I prepared my own notes for some handy data like indices etc. 


Gochi, Agog
2.7k views

“Juvenile delinquency is an outcome of the upheaval that has affected the traditional ways of life in the congenial socio-cultural milieu” Analyse (150 words) (10 marks)

Pointers: -

With the evolution of change in structure of families, life has become freer for individuals but more unstable for families. It is a better and freer life for adults but worse for children. From big, interconnected, and extended families, which helped protect the vulnerable to smaller, detached nuclear families has led to a familial system that has led to a degeneration of values and responsibility of family members towards each other. 

In families and traditional social structures, children through socialization acquired and absorbed the accumulated knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and values of their culture; and learnt the social and interpersonal skills they needed to function effectively in society. Through this process of socialization, children learnt to be responsible and peaceful individuals. Growing up under the joint care of several adults made them feel responsible for all the extended members of the family, besides their own parents. 

With the diminished role of family as an agent of socialization, juvenile delinquency is on the increase. Children are under great stress to be able to meet the ever-increasing challenges of fiercely competitive world of education and employment. They are pushed to drugs and subsequently crimes.

Family factors and parental personal habits like smoking, alcohol intake and substance abuse, involvement in crime, family disharmony, single, separated parents tend to expose children to crime-promoting influences like alcoholism etc. 

In rural setups, usually the male members migrate to cities for job prospects. Lack of attention from both parents, company etc. push kids to crimes. Children are also compelled to work as bonded laborers. They are trapped to grow in a hostage like condition for years. They are insinuated to resort to crimes to obtain freedom from such conditions.

Apart from the above, with less family members to monitor and teach kids the right things, they have unhindered access to all trash on Internet etc. 

The solution cannot be moving back towards a joint family system as the nature of jobs today prevent such a setup. It is the responsibility of the parents to ensure that their kids are exposed to warm family relationships as it has historically proven to reduce the risk of delinquency in a variety of cultures.



Gochi, Agog and 2 others like this
2.7k views
CAN WE REVIVE THIS PLEASE 
Just_restless, AlexanderSupertramp and 5 others like this
2.2k views
@Patootie yes surely. :)


AlexanderSupertramp,
2.1k views
@Patootie plus ethics and paper 2/3 thread 2!!


2k views

MK Yadav QEP how is it??, anyone experienced here please share your review?? 

1.9k views

“Juvenile delinquency is an outcome of the upheaval that has affected the traditional ways of life in the congenial socio-cultural milieu” Analyse (150 words) (10 marks)

Pointers: -

With the evolution of change in structure of families, life has become freer for individuals but more unstable for families. It is a better and freer life for adults but worse for children. From big, interconnected, and extended families, which helped protect the vulnerable to smaller, detached nuclear families has led to a familial system that has led to a degeneration of values and responsibility of family members towards each other. 

In families and traditional social structures, children through socialization acquired and absorbed the accumulated knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and values of their culture; and learnt the social and interpersonal skills they needed to function effectively in society. Through this process of socialization, children learnt to be responsible and peaceful individuals. Growing up under the joint care of several adults made them feel responsible for all the extended members of the family, besides their own parents. 

With the diminished role of family as an agent of socialization, juvenile delinquency is on the increase. Children are under great stress to be able to meet the ever-increasing challenges of fiercely competitive world of education and employment. They are pushed to drugs and subsequently crimes.

Family factors and parental personal habits like smoking, alcohol intake and substance abuse, involvement in crime, family disharmony, single, separated parents tend to expose children to crime-promoting influences like alcoholism etc. 

In rural setups, usually the male members migrate to cities for job prospects. Lack of attention from both parents, company etc. push kids to crimes. Children are also compelled to work as bonded laborers. They are trapped to grow in a hostage like condition for years. They are insinuated to resort to crimes to obtain freedom from such conditions.

Apart from the above, with less family members to monitor and teach kids the right things, they have unhindered access to all trash on Internet etc. 

The solution cannot be moving back towards a joint family system as the nature of jobs today prevent such a setup. It is the responsibility of the parents to ensure that their kids are exposed to warm family relationships as it has historically proven to reduce the risk of delinquency in a variety of cultures.



Apologies for replying this late. Mujhe notification hi nahi aayi apke reply ki. Abhi yeh thread upar aya toh dekha maine. :/

Now coming to the answer, you have written good pointers. You mentioned since the beginning only how family plays a role in JD which i guess was a necessity wrt demand of the question.

When i first read this question, it was a complete bouncer to me. I just had the key word J D in my mind while answering it. Sharing my answer below. :D


1.8k views

let revive this thread. It has very good answer and thoughts - specially on society part. 

Best way to prepare for society is to collaborate the ideas and answer. 

1.7k views

yummy said

let revive this thread. It has very good answer and thoughts - specially on society part. 

Best way to prepare for society is to collaborate the ideas and answer. 

Break over. Can start answer writing full fledged now!

1.6k views

@rashiv Would you want to suggest topics for making brief pointers? 

1.5k views

@rashiv Would you want to suggest topics for making brief pointers? 

I think we can start with something easy like cyclone. Prepare notes for GS 1(geography) and also GS 3 (DM).

As a second option we could do-> impact of lockdown on women (Society)

upsc2020,
1.5k views

rashiv said

@rashiv Would you want to suggest topics for making brief pointers? 

I think we can start with something easy like cyclone. Prepare notes for GS 1(geography) and also GS 3 (DM).

As a second option we could do-> impact of lockdown on women (Society)

Taking up -Impact of Lockdown on Women

AlexanderSupertramp, rashiv and 2 others like this
1.4k views

GS 1: Effects of Lockdown on Women

1.

EconomyWomen’s economic resources are being hit hardest. Economic crises hit women harder. Why?

  • Women tend to earn less.
  • Women have fewer savings.
  • Women are disproportionately more in the informal economy.
  • Women have less access to social protections.
  • Women make up the majority of single-parent household

Oxfam India estimates the economic loss from women losing their jobs during the pandemic at about $216 billion, knocking off 8% from the country’s gross domestic product. World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Index 2020 ranks India 112th of 153 countries in offering equal opportunities to women and men, and women often don’t have the same access to health care and education as their male counterparts.

2. Psychological Impact: Emotional impact of the pandemic is disproportionately falling on women’s shoulders in most countries. Increases in unpaid care and domestic work, job and income loss, and the effects of the lockdown on gender-based violence are among the factors that may be contributing to higher rates of stress and anxiety among women.

3. Increased the unpaid care and domestic workload, and women are bearing the heaviest burden. Factors such as double shifts for working women, the absence of assistance of house-help, and the increased need for cooking, cleaning, caring and hygiene is further increasing and tipping our skewed balance of domestic work today.

4. Public transit was interrupted across regions, limiting many women’s mobility as they are less likely than men to own a vehicle. 

5. Civil society organizations (CSOs) who provide services to women victims of violence have seen increases in the number of victims reaching out for help. More than 40 per cent of those CSOs saw increases in cases of violence perpetrated by family members. National Commission for Women has recorded a two-fold increase in gender-based violence across the country, with the body receiving 257 calls in the final week of March as opposed to 116 calls in the first week.

6. There are 11.8 million women with disabilities in India who experience considerable difficulties in the everyday lives. With high poverty levels, poor health conditions, lower incomes, lower education and a patriarchal system they face further dangers in COVID-19. Information to the deaf and those with intellectual disabilities was not available. Personal assistants and health care were not available. It was also seen that the policy of social distancing was excluding them as they were dependent on personal assistants.

7. Education: girls’ education was disadvantaged — as only 29% of Internet users in India are female, and there’s  tendency for families with limited means to give preference to boys for schooling.

8. Women were at higher risk of contracting the virus because they are overrepresented in the health-care sector.

9. Provision of family planning and other sexual health commodities including menstrual health items were impacted as supply chains were under strains from the pandemic. Unplanned pregnancies due to lack of abortion facilities.

10. Small and growing businesses (SGBs) have been hit during the pandemic esp. women entrepreneurs. Gender-lens investing was becoming a part of mainstream conversations but that took a setback.

11. A positive effect of the pandemic, could be that employers start offering more flexible and work-at-home options to their employees. This would help educated women enter and stay in the labour force and not be forced to drop out after child-birth, though the long-term implications for career progression will be unclear in this option.

Since public health emergencies are not gender-neutral, it’s time to devise a gender-balanced response to fight them. Post Covid-19 situation may bring more and more behavioural and mental changes among women with huge post-traumatic stress. Policy decisions need to articulate gendered concerns during public health emergencies because gender-sensitive pandemic planning may substantially mitigate these concerns.

 

@rashiv

Naadan_Parinda, Dhertez and 7 others like this
1.1k views

GS 1: Effects of Lockdown on Women

1.

EconomyWomen’s economic resources are being hit hardest. Economic crises hit women harder. Why?

  • Women tend to earn less.
  • Women have fewer savings.
  • Women are disproportionately more in the informal economy.
  • Women have less access to social protections.
  • Women make up the majority of single-parent household

Oxfam India estimates the economic loss from women losing their jobs during the pandemic at about $216 billion, knocking off 8% from the country’s gross domestic product. World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Index 2020 ranks India 112th of 153 countries in offering equal opportunities to women and men, and women often don’t have the same access to health care and education as their male counterparts.

2. Psychological Impact: Emotional impact of the pandemic is disproportionately falling on women’s shoulders in most countries. Increases in unpaid care and domestic work, job and income loss, and the effects of the lockdown on gender-based violence are among the factors that may be contributing to higher rates of stress and anxiety among women.

3. Increased the unpaid care and domestic workload, and women are bearing the heaviest burden. Factors such as double shifts for working women, the absence of assistance of house-help, and the increased need for cooking, cleaning, caring and hygiene is further increasing and tipping our skewed balance of domestic work today.

4. Public transit was interrupted across regions, limiting many women’s mobility as they are less likely than men to own a vehicle. 

5. Civil society organizations (CSOs) who provide services to women victims of violence have seen increases in the number of victims reaching out for help. More than 40 per cent of those CSOs saw increases in cases of violence perpetrated by family members. National Commission for Women has recorded a two-fold increase in gender-based violence across the country, with the body receiving 257 calls in the final week of March as opposed to 116 calls in the first week.

6. There are 11.8 million women with disabilities in India who experience considerable difficulties in the everyday lives. With high poverty levels, poor health conditions, lower incomes, lower education and a patriarchal system they face further dangers in COVID-19. Information to the deaf and those with intellectual disabilities was not available. Personal assistants and health care were not available. It was also seen that the policy of social distancing was excluding them as they were dependent on personal assistants.

7. Education: girls’ education was disadvantaged — as only 29% of Internet users in India are female, and there’s  tendency for families with limited means to give preference to boys for schooling.

8. Women were at higher risk of contracting the virus because they are overrepresented in the health-care sector.

9. Provision of family planning and other sexual health commodities including menstrual health items were impacted as supply chains were under strains from the pandemic. Unplanned pregnancies due to lack of abortion facilities.

10. Small and growing businesses (SGBs) have been hit during the pandemic esp. women entrepreneurs. Gender-lens investing was becoming a part of mainstream conversations but that took a setback.

11. A positive effect of the pandemic, could be that employers start offering more flexible and work-at-home options to their employees. This would help educated women enter and stay in the labour force and not be forced to drop out after child-birth, though the long-term implications for career progression will be unclear in this option.

Since public health emergencies are not gender-neutral, it’s time to devise a gender-balanced response to fight them. Post Covid-19 situation may bring more and more behavioural and mental changes among women with huge post-traumatic stress. Policy decisions need to articulate gendered concerns during public health emergencies because gender-sensitive pandemic planning may substantially mitigate these concerns.

 

@rashiv

My notes had a lot of similarity in points (except the first part where you noted the vulnerability of women). Below mentioned are the points from my notes which would be in addition to your notes 

    Data 

    1. 20% increase in violence against women worldwide (UN)

    Impact 

    1. UN Women- 1.5 trillion $ loss due to violence on women 
    2. Women impact-> impacts child-> demographic dividend 
    3. Failure of protection of HR 
    4. Reduces gains achieved in past years 
    5. Suicides

    Way forward 

    1. Gender auditing and perspective during crisis 
    2. UN Women- strengthen services like helpline, digital counsellor, online reporting

     - message from law enforcement officers to reassure women and against men. Eg Mumbai police on Twitter 

     - women part of decision making process to have inclusive outcomes 

    Naadan_Parinda, GaryVee and 3 others like this
    1k views

    rashiv said

    GS 1: Effects of Lockdown on Women

    1.

    EconomyWomen’s economic resources are being hit hardest. Economic crises hit women harder. Why?

    • Women tend to earn less.
    • Women have fewer savings.
    • Women are disproportionately more in the informal economy.
    • Women have less access to social protections.
    • Women make up the majority of single-parent household

    Oxfam India estimates the economic loss from women losing their jobs during the pandemic at about $216 billion, knocking off 8% from the country’s gross domestic product. World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Index 2020 ranks India 112th of 153 countries in offering equal opportunities to women and men, and women often don’t have the same access to health care and education as their male counterparts.

    2. Psychological Impact: Emotional impact of the pandemic is disproportionately falling on women’s shoulders in most countries. Increases in unpaid care and domestic work, job and income loss, and the effects of the lockdown on gender-based violence are among the factors that may be contributing to higher rates of stress and anxiety among women.

    3. Increased the unpaid care and domestic workload, and women are bearing the heaviest burden. Factors such as double shifts for working women, the absence of assistance of house-help, and the increased need for cooking, cleaning, caring and hygiene is further increasing and tipping our skewed balance of domestic work today.

    4. Public transit was interrupted across regions, limiting many women’s mobility as they are less likely than men to own a vehicle. 

    5. Civil society organizations (CSOs) who provide services to women victims of violence have seen increases in the number of victims reaching out for help. More than 40 per cent of those CSOs saw increases in cases of violence perpetrated by family members. National Commission for Women has recorded a two-fold increase in gender-based violence across the country, with the body receiving 257 calls in the final week of March as opposed to 116 calls in the first week.

    6. There are 11.8 million women with disabilities in India who experience considerable difficulties in the everyday lives. With high poverty levels, poor health conditions, lower incomes, lower education and a patriarchal system they face further dangers in COVID-19. Information to the deaf and those with intellectual disabilities was not available. Personal assistants and health care were not available. It was also seen that the policy of social distancing was excluding them as they were dependent on personal assistants.

    7. Education: girls’ education was disadvantaged — as only 29% of Internet users in India are female, and there’s  tendency for families with limited means to give preference to boys for schooling.

    8. Women were at higher risk of contracting the virus because they are overrepresented in the health-care sector.

    9. Provision of family planning and other sexual health commodities including menstrual health items were impacted as supply chains were under strains from the pandemic. Unplanned pregnancies due to lack of abortion facilities.

    10. Small and growing businesses (SGBs) have been hit during the pandemic esp. women entrepreneurs. Gender-lens investing was becoming a part of mainstream conversations but that took a setback.

    11. A positive effect of the pandemic, could be that employers start offering more flexible and work-at-home options to their employees. This would help educated women enter and stay in the labour force and not be forced to drop out after child-birth, though the long-term implications for career progression will be unclear in this option.

    Since public health emergencies are not gender-neutral, it’s time to devise a gender-balanced response to fight them. Post Covid-19 situation may bring more and more behavioural and mental changes among women with huge post-traumatic stress. Policy decisions need to articulate gendered concerns during public health emergencies because gender-sensitive pandemic planning may substantially mitigate these concerns.

     

    @rashiv

    My notes had a lot of similarity in points (except the first part where you noted the vulnerability of women). Below mentioned are the points from my notes which would be in addition to your notes 

      Data 

      1. 20% increase in violence against women worldwide (UN)

      Impact 

      1. UN Women- 1.5 trillion $ loss due to violence on women 
      2. Women impact-> impacts child-> demographic dividend 
      3. Failure of protection of HR 
      4. Reduces gains achieved in past years 
      5. Suicides

      Way forward 

      1. Gender auditing and perspective during crisis 
      2. UN Women- strengthen services like helpline, digital counsellor, online reporting

       - message from law enforcement officers to reassure women and against men. Eg Mumbai police on Twitter 

       - women part of decision making process to have inclusive outcomes 

      Holistic. Makes this topic complete. 

      912 views

      @rashiv 

      Next? I suggest,

      Internal Migration - Causes, Impact, Govt policies

      854 views

      @rashiv 

      Next? I suggest,

      Internal Migration - Causes, Impact, Govt policies

      Yes, good next topic to take up ! 

      788 views
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